Tag: Battles

History’s Greatest Battles From the Battle of Marathon to D-Day


Nigel Cawthorne, "History’s Greatest Battles: From the Battle of Marathon to D-Day"
English | ISBN: 1398815039 | 2022 | 304 pages | EPUB | 5 MB
Great battles mark history’s turning points where cultures and ideologies clash. Some battles are won by inspired leaders, some by superior weaponry, while others are won by a sheer dogged refusal to surrender in the face of overwhelming odds.

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Different Battles The Search for a World War Hero


Different Battles: The Search for a World War Hero by Rody Johnson
English | April 20, 2016 | ISBN: 1523398426 | 200 pages | EPUB | 0.88 Mb
In 1942 Nazi submarines sink ships along the Florida Coast. Off Vero Beach Coast Guard Auxiliary volunteer Kit Johnson in his small fishing boat rescues 22 survivors from the tanker Java Arrow. The ship has been torpedoed by famed U-boat Commander Peter Cremer. Forty years later Johnson’s son, author Rody Johnson, wants to know the details. His father has never talked about the war and has Alzheimers. The son tracks down Cremer and travels to Germany. In telling the story the author recreates vivid scenes from the naval encounter while describing his search into the lives of what he discovers are two heroes, each from a different side of the war.

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The Great Battles of All Time [Audiobook]


English | ASIN: B0B94L96J2 | 2022 | 13 hours and 9 minutes | MP3 | M4B | 362 MB
Cannae and Agincourt, Waterloo and Gettysburg, Stalingrad and Midway, this compact volume collects the most influential battles and conflicts in history. Covering the past twenty-five centuries, editor Jeremy Black analyzes the effects these events have had on the development of states and civilizations. Organized chronologically in seven parts, the chapters feature ancient and medieval worlds as well as the wars of the past hundred years, including recent conflicts in the Middle East. The contributors analyze land battles as well as sieges such as Constantinople (1453) and Tenochtitlan (1521); naval battles such as Actium (31 BCE), Trafalgar (1805), and Tsushima (1905); and the crucial conflicts in the air during the Battle of Britain (1940) and the American attack on Japan (1945).
The Great Battles in History’s coverage is truly worldwide in scope, from the battle in Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, where the Germans defeated the Romans, to Hakata Bay in 1281, where the Japanese defeated the Mongols, and the first battle of Panipat in 1526, where the Mughals conquered Hindustan. Black presents a masterly overview of advances in military technology, and of the changing tactics and strategy of battlefield commanders from Hannibal to Napoleon Bonaparte, Bernard Montgomery, and Dwight D. Eisenhower.

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The Darkest Days of the War The Battles of luka and Corinth (Audiobook)


English | 2010 | MP3 | M4B | ASIN: B0041VP7W0 | Duration: 14:32 h | 396 MB
Peter Cozzens / Narrated by Don Hagen
During the late summer of 1862, Confederate forces attempted a three-pronged strategic advance into the North. The outcome of this offensive, the only coordinated Confederate attempt to carry the conflict to the enemy, was disastrous. The results at Antietam and in Kentucky are well known; the third offensive, the northern Mississippi campaign, led to the devastating and little-studied defeats at Iuka and Corinth, defeats that would open the way for Grant’s attack on Vicksburg.

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The Greatest Battles in History The Battle of Moscow During World War II


The Greatest Battles in History: The Battle of Moscow During World War II by Charles River Editors
English | September 17, 2015 | ISBN: 1517369711 | 83 pages | EPUB | 2.76 Mb
*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the battle written by participants on both sides *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "We underestimated the enemy’s strength, as well as his size and climate." – Heinz Guderian World War II was fought on a scale unlike anything before or since in human history, and the unfathomable casualty counts are attributable in large measure to the carnage inflicted between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during Hitler’s invasion of Russia and Stalin’s desperate defense. The invasion came in 1941 following a nonaggression pact signed between the two in 1939, which allowed Hitler to focus his attention on the west without having to worry about an attack from the eastern front. While Germany was focusing on the west, the Soviet Union sent large contingents of troops to the border region between the two countries, and Stalin’s plan to take territory in Poland and the Baltic States angered Hitler. By 1940, Hitler viewed Stalin as a major threat and had made the decision to invade Russia: "In the course of this contest, Russia must be disposed of…Spring 1941. The quicker we smash Russia the better." While a legend exists today that Hitler’s strategic fecklessness destroyed Germany’s chances, despite the wise objections of the Wehrmacht general staff (OKW), the actual situation in 1941 resembled the precise reverse of this familiar historical trope. The historian Robert Forczyk argues convincingly that the Fuhrer retained his full strategic acumen in 1941, until he ill-advisedly adopted the suggestions of the OKW and diverted forces in a winter campaign to seize the Soviet capital, leading to the Battle of Moscow. The Third Reich’s dictator initially viewed Moscow as a relatively trivial objective, only to be seized once the Red Army suffered defeat in detail. In fact, he planned a pause during the bitter Russian winter, conserving German strength for a fresh offensive in spring of 1942. Wisely, According to Chief of Operations Colonel Heusinger, Hitler manifested "an instinctive aversion to treading the same path as Napoleon […] Moscow gives him a sinister feeling." Despite the obstructionism of the OKW General Staff – centered around Fedor von Bock, Franz Halder and Brauschitsch, who obsessed over taking Moscow and reacted to the Fuhrer’s focus on the south with open rage and contempt – the southern offensive went ahead, securing another stunning victory over the Soviets and seizing the economically vital Donets Basin. In the meantime, Stalin immolated hundreds of thousands of his own soldiers in futile attacks against Army Group Center, holding the German front facing Moscow. Halder ultimately drafted the plan for Operation Typhoon, the October 1941 thrust towards Moscow, and Hitler showed considerable reluctance to agree to the attack, believing it best if the Germans suspended operations until spring. Halder and his OKW clique persisted, however, badgering the Fuhrer until Hitler imprudently yielded to their demands. The head of the Third Reich apparently succumbed to Halder’s and Bock’s importuning mostly due to unrestrained ebullience over the southern success. He felt that at this stage, "nothing could go wrong." In doing so, he forgot the keenly insightful precept of the 17th century samurai general Oda Nobunaga, who declared, "After a victory, tighten your helmet straps." Far from maintaining his focus, however, Hitler relaxed and let his guard down. His surrender to Halder’s impractical plan signaled the beginning of an ominous reversal of Wehrmacht fortunes whose seeds sprouted at the Battle of Moscow. The Greatest Battles in History: The Battle of Moscow During World War II chronicles the operations that saw the Soviets push back the Nazis from their capital. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Battle of Moscow like never before.

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