Tag: Nazi

Vichy France The History of Nazi Germany’s Occupation of France during World War II


Vichy France: The History of Nazi Germany’s Occupation of France during World War II by Charles River Editors
English | January 13, 2016 | ISBN: 1523384549 | 52 pages | EPUB | 0.85 Mb
*Includes pictures *Profiles the history of the occupation and what life and government was like in Vichy France *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Emerging from France’s catastrophic 1940 defeat like a bedraggled and rather sinister phoenix, the French State – better known to history as "Vichy France" or the "Vichy Regime" after its spa-town capital – stands in history as a unique and bizarre creation of German Fuhrer Adolf Hitler’s European conquests. A patchwork of paradoxes and contradictions, the Vichy Regime maintained a quasi-independent French nation for some time after the Third Reich invasion until the Germans decided to include it in their occupation zone. Headed by a French war hero of World War I, Marshal Philippe Petain, and his later Prime Minister Pierre Laval, Vichy France displayed strong right-wing, conservative, and authoritarian tendencies. Nevertheless, it never lapsed fully into fascism until the Germans arrived to reduce its role to little more than a mask over their own dominion. Petain carried out several major initiatives in an effort to counteract the alleged "decadence" of modern life and to restore the strength and "virtues" of the French "race." Accordingly, he received willing support from more conservative elements of society, even some factions within the Catholic Church. Following Case Anton – the takeover of the unoccupied area by the Germans – native French fascist elements also emerged. While the French later disowned the Vichy government with considerable vehemence, evidence such as fairly broad-based popular support prior to Case Anton suggests a somewhat different story. The Petain government expressed one facet of French culture and thought. Its conservative, imperialistic nature did not represent the widespread love of "liberty, fraternity, and equality" also deeply ingrained in French thinking, but neither did it constitute a complete divergence from a national history that produced such famous authoritarians as Louis XIV and Napoleon Bonaparte. Vichy France: The History of Nazi Germany’s Occupation of France during World War II looks at France after its downfall and the occupation that lasted until late 1944. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Vichy France like never before, in no time at all.

(more…)

The Nazi Party in Dissolution Hitler and the Verbotzeit 1923-25


David Jablonsky, "The Nazi Party in Dissolution: Hitler and the Verbotzeit 1923-25 "
English | ISBN: 0714633224 | 2004 | 248 pages | EPUB | 4 MB
This book examines the effect the Verbotzeit had on the leadership structure and on the consequent position of the party within the völkisch movement. Looking primarily at Bavaria and North Germany it examines the failed attempts that were made to prevent Hitler from filling the leadership void within both the NSDAP (the National Socialist German Workers’ Party) and the völkisch movement.

(more…)

Hitler’s Compromises Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany (Audiobook)


English | 2017 | MP3 | M4B | ASIN: B06XHQV87Z | Duration: 14:51 h | 346 MB
Nathan Stoltzfus / Narrated by Shaun Grindell
History has focused on Hitler’s use of charisma and terror, asserting that the dictator made few concessions to maintain power. Nathan Stoltzfus, the award-winning author of Resistance of Heart: Intermarriage and the Rosenstrasse Protest in Germany, challenges this notion, assessing the surprisingly frequent tactical compromises Hitler made in order to preempt hostility and win the German people’s complete fealty. As part of his strategy to secure a "1,000-year Reich", Hitler sought to convince the German people to believe in Nazism so they would perpetuate it permanently and actively shun those who were out of step with society. When widespread public dissent occurred at home – which most often happened when policies conflicted with popular traditions or encroached on private life – Hitler made careful calculations and acted strategically to maintain his popular image. Extending from the 1920s to the regime’s collapse, this revealing history makes a powerful and original argument that will inspire a major rethinking of Hitler’s rule.

(more…)

The lost museum the Nazi conspiracy to steal the world’s greatest works of art


The lost museum the Nazi conspiracy to steal the world’s greatest works of art By Hector Feliciano
1997 | 278 Pages | ISBN: 0465041914 | PDF | 29 MB
The Lost Museum explores the Nazis’ systematic confiscation of these artworks, focusing on the private collections of five families: Rothschild, Rosenberg, Bernheim-Jeune, David-Weill, and Schloss. The book is filled with private family photos of this art, some of which has never before been seen by the public, and it traces the fate of these works as they passed through the hands of top German officials, unscrupulous art dealers, and unwitting auction houses such as Christie’s and Sotheby’s. Many works were returned to their owners after the war, but thousands of them – and, in some cases, their owners – disappeared. Some of these lost artworks are tracked down in this book to their present-day locations in Europe and the United States. More than 2,000 of the works that were looted or sold to the Nazis found their way into French national museums, where they are labeled as "unclaimed." Still others can be found in Switzerland. Hector Feliciano spent more than seven years tracking down the story of this Nazi pillaging. Drawing on recently declassified documents, interrogation reports, detailed Nazi inventories, private family archives, museum catalogs, and dozens of interviews, Feliciano paints a vivid picture of a concealed international art trade with links in France, Germany, Switzerland, Great Britain, the former Soviet Union, and the United States – controversial disclosures that have provoked an ongoing debate in Europe.

(more…)

‘Adolf Island’ The Nazi occupation of Alderney


Kevin Colls, "’Adolf Island’: The Nazi occupation of Alderney"
English | ISBN: 1526149060 | 2022 | 488 pages | EPUB | 6 MB
‘Adolf Island’ offers new forensic, archaeological and spatial perspectives on the Nazi forced and slave labour programme that was initiated on the Channel Island of Alderney during its occupation in the Second World War. Drawing on extensive archival research and the results of the first in-field investigations of the ‘crime scenes’ since 1945, the book identifies and characterises the network of concentration and labour camps, fortifications, burial sites and other material traces connected to the occupation, providing new insights into the identities and experiences of the men and women who lived, worked and died within this landscape. Moving beyond previous studies focused on military aspects of occupation, the book argues that Alderney was intrinsically linked to wider systems of Nazi forced and slave labour.

(more…)